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Second FMD Case in Surrey - NFU Scotland Reaction
07/08/07

NFU Scotland has reiterated the critical importance of the GB-wide ban on the movements on animals susceptible to Foot and Mouth Disease in light of a second case being confirmed on a farm within the Protection Zone in Surrey.

beef steer

The Union has stressed that there should be no movements of livestock other than those allowed under General Licence (see notes for details). Likewise the need for continued vigilance amongst farmers and high biosecurity precautions is being emphasised.

NFUS has been in contact with veterinary authorities to assess the implications of the latest case for the disease risk assessment in Scotland and still expects farmers to be allowed to move animals direct to abattoirs for slaughter, hopefully from tomorrow (Wednesday). This is subject to abattoirs obtaining the necessary authorisation, a condition of which is the provision of approved cleansing and disinfecting facilities.

NFUS President Jim McLaren said:

“This second case is within the Protection Zone and in some ways there is not huge surprise that there have been further infected animals found in this very localised area.

“We are still in the critical, early stage of the disease outbreak so the movement ban remains vital and that is a message we are hammering home to all our members.

“In discussions yesterday with the Cabinet Secretary Richard Lochhead, his Chief Vet Charles Milne and other officials, we explored the options for getting animals moving direct from farms to abattoirs, which remains a top priority. Obviously, we will only want to see such movements happen if veterinary advice is that it doesn’t expose us to further disease risks. Our understanding is that this second case doesn’t alter the risk assessment here and therefore won’t prevent these kinds of movements beginning, we hope, from tomorrow.”

The Scottish Executive foot and mouth helpline is 0845 155 33 66

NOTES:

General licences for the movement of dairy cattle for milking and all susceptible animals for emergency veterinary treatment have been agreed.  The details are as follows:

In summary

  • A general licence has been put in place to allow the movement of cows along a public highway from one part of a premise to another part of the same premises, for the purposes of milking only.
  • A general licence has been issued to allow for the movement of susceptible animals along a public highway from one part of a premise to another part of the same premises for the purposes of emergency veterinary treatment. Treatment does not need to be done by a vet but must be for emergency animal health and welfare purposes. If movement may be required off the premises for health or welfare reasons you should contact your local Animal Health office.
  • Livestock can not be moved across a road unless the movement is covered by a general licence for either movement for milking or movement for emergency veterinary treatment and then only from one part of a premise to another part of the same premises. All other movements are banned.

General licence for the movement of cows for milking along a public highway

This licence permits the movement of cows from one part of premises to another part of the same premises using a public highway for the purpose of milking provided that any animal excreta is removed from the part of the highway used immediately after the movement is completed.

Failure to observe the measures required in this licence is an offence under Section 73 of the Animal Health Act 1981. The penalty on conviction of an offence under this section is a maximum of six months imprisonment and/or a 5,000 fine.

General licence for the movement of susceptible animals for emergency veterinary treatment along a public highway.
 
This licence permits the movement of susceptible animals from one part of premises to another part of the same premises using a public highway for the purpose of emergency veterinary treatment of the animals provided that any animal excreta is removed from the part of the highway used immediately after the movement is completed.
 
Failure to observe the measures required in this licence is an offence under Section 73 of the Animal Health Act 1981. The penalty on conviction of an offence under this section is a maximum of six months imprisonment and/or a 5,000 fine.

link CLA Latest: Foot and Mouth Outbreak
link Foot and Mouth Disease: Thursley National Nature Reserve Remains Open
link Scottish Farmers on High Alert as FMD Restrictions Hit Hard

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NFU Scotland