2019-07-12 

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Exceptional Lake District Hill Farm to be Sold at Auction

H&H Michael C L Hodgson have launched to the market, Cragg Farm – a traditional Lake District Hill Farm near Ravenglass in the western Lake District (UNESCO World Heritage Site) which is to be sold by Public Auction.

This 253 acre ring-fenced, upland farm with its hefted flock, includes meadow and grazing land, a substantial four-bedroom farmhouse, a range of modern and traditional buildings, grazing rights on Birkby Fell and potential for development.

Cragg Farm

Cragg Farm

With a guide price of £850,000 to £900,000, Cragg Farm is to be sold by Public Auction as a whole at Muncaster Parish Hall in Ravenglass on Wednesday 28th August 2019 at 2.30pm. Interested parties are invited to two set viewing days at Cragg Farm on Thursday 25th July and Tuesday 13th August, between 10am - 3pm.

The land at Cragg Farm extends to 253 acres of SDA land and moorland, with two crags; Raven Crag and Latter Barrow. Also included in the sale are the rights to graze 611 sheep with followers and 22 cattle on Birkby Fell.  

Commenting on the launch of Cragg Farm to the market, Mark Barrow, Head of Land Agency (South Lakes) at H&H Michael C L Hodgson, said:
“Cragg Farm is a diverse property and good example of a Cumbrian upland farm and in recent times, farms such as this being brought onto the open market are relatively few and far between.     

“As such, I believe that this farm will attract interest from a range of buyers including those wanting to upsize or purchase secondary holdings, new entrants/tenants looking for their first owner occupied holding, to investors wanting to spread their portfolio across a range of land types to reduce the risk of subsidy monies being directed to the uplands.

“The land is in sound order and there is the added benefit of the hefted flock, common rights and associated scheme income. In addition, and unlike many farms, there is also the provision of plenty of opportunities for diversification and development given the property’s attributes which must be viewed to fully appreciate.”

To claim the income from the Commons Stewardship scheme, the outgoing tenant has agreed to sell a proportion of his flock, and this consists of 250 Herdwick Ewes and followers. 

Two lower lying fields are part of Cropple How Mire, a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).  This land along with the rich bilberry and flora found on the top of the two crags would suggest potential for entry of the holding in to a stewardship scheme and further scheme income.

The farm buildings include a range of both traditional and modern farm buildings, a lofted barn range, workshop, midden area and loose housing. The traditional buildings have the potential, subject to receiving planning permission, to be created into an additional source of income or for a new lifestyle opportunity.

“The property itself has a huge amount of character and occupies fantastic views over the neighbouring countryside. For investors, there is the property development potential in a sought-after area of the Lake District National Park”, concluded Mark.

Michael Hodgson

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