2017-04-28  

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Brand New Grasses Sown at Stoneleigh by Barenbrug

Experts from Barenbrug will be at Grassland & Muck this May, offering UK farmers advice on how to get more from their grass, and which species and varieties to pick – depending on enterprise requirements.

In preparation for the triennial show, Barenbrug has sown 28 demonstration plots at Stoneleigh – including three areas devoted to brand new products.

  • Bar Finisher – a mix of chicory, white clover, red clover and plantain, which produces a leafy, high quality feed from spring to autumn, and offers excellent animal performance potential

  • Artemis – a highly nutritious lucerne that combines good digestibility with high proteins to support excellent milk yields or daily live weight gains.

  • Hybrid 4x4 – a highly productive hybrid ryegrass cutting ley designed for a three or four year rotation system.

Trial Plots

Trial Plots

Highlighting the vast array of grass varieties and mixtures available to UK farmers, the Barenbrug team has also sown areas dedicated to numerous perennial ryegrass species including Fintona, the highest yielding ryegrass variety ever developed. There are also plots allocated to Comer – a highly palatable Timothy grass which grows well in very wet conditions; Bartyle – a Cocksfoot that is ideal for dry areas thanks to its drought tolerance; plus tall fescues; silage crops; and clovers.

David Johnston, a top grass seed breeder from AFBI – the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute – will join Barenbrug’s grass experts at Grassland & Muck. Together they’ll dispense advice on getting a grip on grass growth. They’ll also be discussing Barenbrug’s Good Grass Guide. This free handy toolkit is designed to help farms gauge grass quality and work out what to do with fields in different states of repair to ensure maximum return on investment.

barenbrug

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link Make More Milk from Home Grown Grass